bookishness · out and about

Food Trails by Lonely Planet ~~Book review

Being fifty-something, I’m all for the road less travelled. Give me a quiet, uncrowded journey where the magic unfolds at my pace. If that magic is punctuated by new food experiences, all the better. In Food Trails, Lonely Planet unpacks 52 short breaks embracing the road less travelled through a cherry-picked collection of the world’s… Continue reading Food Trails by Lonely Planet ~~Book review

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The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins ~~ a book review

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’, she calls them. Their life – as she sees it… Continue reading The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins ~~ a book review

bookishness · health matters

Is your job making you fat? ~~ Book Review

Is your job making you fat? How to lose weight and control your waist at work By Ken Lloyd, PhD & Stacey Laura Lloyd (Nero Books) When I sighted the cover of this book, I expected a light-weight how-to about “al desko” exercise rationalised by more of the “sitting is the new smoking” message we’re all… Continue reading Is your job making you fat? ~~ Book Review

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All That I Am by Anna Funder (a book review)

Don’t be fooled by the cover of Anna Funder’s All That I am. This achingly beautiful novel is anything but “chick lit”. At 370 pages, it’s a solid read that ribbons through an in-between-the-big-wars time, when lines were blurred between friend and foe. Funder cleverly chooses two alternating narrative points of view from within the ranks of… Continue reading All That I Am by Anna Funder (a book review)

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Book Review: Murder in Mississippi by John Safran

Where have you been all my life, true crime genre? Murder in Mississippi is my first foray into the category and I’m smitten. I always imagined true crime narratives espoused from the point of view of an expert, serious criminologist schooled in the science and art of detection. Instead, in Murder in Mississippi, John Safran… Continue reading Book Review: Murder in Mississippi by John Safran

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Book Review: The Roving Party by Rohan Wilson

“1829, Tasmania. A group of men—convicts, a farmer, two free black traders, and Black Bill, an aboriginal man brought up from childhood as a white man—are led by Jon Batman, a notorious historical figure, on a ‘roving party.’ Their purpose is massacre. With promises of freedom, land grants and money, each is willing to risk… Continue reading Book Review: The Roving Party by Rohan Wilson

bookishness · inspiring folk

Book review: Eureka – The Unfinished Revolution by Peter Fitzsimons

“In 1854, Victorian miners fought a deadly battle under the flag of the Southern Cross at the Eureka Stockade. Though brief and doomed to fail, the battle is legend in both our history and in the Australian mind. Henry Lawson wrote poems about it, its symbolic flag is still raised, and even the nineteenth-century visitor… Continue reading Book review: Eureka – The Unfinished Revolution by Peter Fitzsimons